Creation Care

Celebrating Earth Day at 50

Nine local churches in Columbus, Ohio, hosted fourteen projects with a poverty theme, including creating a community garden on May 1, 2010. Advocacy and learning workshops coupled with service projects on Poverty & Global Health, Poverty & Neighborhoods, Poverty & Africa, Poverty & Environment led off the first ever Love First Walk to support children in Poverty, ending with a rally on the Statehouse Lawn at Capitol Square. Photo by Diane Degnan, United Methodist Communications
Nine local churches in Columbus, Ohio, hosted fourteen projects with a poverty theme, including creating a community garden on May 1, 2010. Advocacy and learning workshops coupled with service projects on Poverty & Global Health, Poverty & Neighborhoods, Poverty & Africa, Poverty & Environment led off the first ever Love First Walk to support children in Poverty, ending with a rally on the Statehouse Lawn at Capitol Square. Photo by Diane Degnan, United Methodist Communications

April 22, 2020, marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. The annual celebration of the wonders and miracles of nature also draws attention to important environmental issues and causes such as climate change, energy conservation and sustainability efforts.

Church and Society has partnered with Creation Justice Ministries − an ecumenical environmental justice movement − to provide congregational resources for churches to use in worship or other settings to celebrate Earth Day. The theme for this year is "The Fierce Urgency of Now.” The same resources can be used to celebrate the Festival of God’s Creation, set for April 19 on the official United Methodist calendar. Each year, the Festival is set on the Sunday nearest Earth Day.

“All creation is the Lord’s, and we are responsible for the ways in which we use and abuse it. Water, air, soil, minerals, energy resources, plants, animal life, and space are to be valued and conserved because they are God’s creation and not solely because they are useful to human beings.” United Methodist Social Principles, ¶160

The United Methodist Church acknowledges the importance of environmental protection as a part of Christians’ call to be good stewards of God's creation while ensuring sustainability for future generations. Climate justice is also vital to social and racial reconciliation as too often the poor and minority communities are affected by pollution and environmental disasters disproportionately.

Download Earth Day Resources

Other Resources